DEMocracy Dies in Slow Burn

Joyce Evans-Campbell, a journalist, poet, blogger and She Writes member.

#RiseUpforDemocracy
Rep. Elijah Cummings, (D- Md.), said, “I’ll fight for it until I die.” It’s our right to protect what’s ours to keep.” He’s warning Americans about the urgency to defy danger to our democracy. In January, he breathed easier with the dissolution of the President’s Election Integrity Commission, which Cummings said it shouldn’t have been set up.
“Its dissolution was long overdue for it wasted taxpayer dollars to justify deception of widespread voter fraud and to impose abusive new voter suppression laws.”
.@realDonaldTrump demanded that the commission check every crevice, corner, and closet for fraudulent voting after he denied that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by a historical 2.9 million votes more than him. Cummings contends that such widespread complaint about voter fraud is detrimental and an alarming slam against the right to vote — fundamental for freedom.
A defiant and dedicated Cummings said, “We must remain vigilant. We need to focus on protecting our elections, ensuring the security of our infrastructure, fighting voter suppression, and expanding access to the ballot box. Americans have died for the right to vote, and I will continue to do everything in my power to safeguard this sacred right.”
Cummings isn’t going to lie down in complicity because he knows how far the nation has come and that the path to freedom is long, and “we have not overcome.” The negative direction is a dastardly affront to freedom, justice and equality. Undisputedly: Democracy disintegrates slowly, according to deafening voices from authors with a literary bullhorn. (Part 2 lists these authors’ writing desperation and responses for change)
#MeToo, #NeverAgain, #BlackLivesMatter have risen as proxies to protect the nation’s democratic tenets — freedom, justice and equality, Freedom of Press, Freedom of Speech, and other Constitutional rights and protective powers. But the knowledge is intercepted by detachment, despair, denial and desensitization.

(1) Inattentiveness: The rationale for ignoring an eminent danger to the nation: Hard-working citizens who’re struggling with pocketbook and time-related issues skip TV news or newspapers — the “watchdog” media — a vigilant source uncovering political villains and those who violate laws and Constitutional rights.
(2) Denial: Nothing’s wrong, and the clarion call for fracture is unnecessary. The misnomer of “fake news” demeans and discredits the truth by responsible journalists whose stories are the public’s right to know.                                                                                   (3) Misguided Focus: Sex, Lies, Chaos, Attacks on Rivals and Critics, and Tweet Storms as “distasteful character flaws” but smear campaigns distract from the egregiousness toward undermining rights and freedoms in the United States of America. Polarization isn’t a part of the “one nation” creed.
(4) Escapism & De-stressing: Some citizens say, “If you’re depressed, turn off the news and don’t read the paper. They say, “I just stop looking because news is so depressing. There’s nothing but bad stuff in there.”
The more you know, the more awareness, and the more believability. Why worry about the world’s most powerful democracy? Congress has oversight responsibility: Republicans control both houses, but, intentionally or unintentionally, lack moral and legal courage to act.

The founders intended to protect the circumventing of democracy, but the current turmoil and threats weren’t a foregone conclusion. Congress is complict in their silence, but the people have the power to rise, act and speak up if they respect their rights. President Abraham Lincoln’s premise to preserve a perfect union is government by the people, for the people and of the people. One major newspaer joins the course of heightened awareness and warning.
The Washington Post’s designated, meaningful, and dire message: Democracy Dies in Darkness.”

 

 

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